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A new study says the antiviral drug on its own won't be enough to significantly curb COVID-19 cases and deaths. There are several dual-drug trials already underway to see if remdesivir paired with another drug could help boost outcomes.

Remdesivir Will Not Be Enough to Curb COVID-19, Study Finds

SATURDAY, May 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There have been high hopes that the antiviral drug remdesivir might be an answer to the pandemic of COVID-19. But a major, new study finds the drug on its own won't be enough to significantly curb cases and deaths.

The study, published May 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that, "given high mortality [of patients] despite the use of remdesivir, it is clear that treatment with an antiviral drug alone is not likely to be sufficient."

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The goal is to make at least 300 million doses of a coronavirus vaccine that could be available as early as October.

U.S. Earmarks $1.2 Billion for New Vaccine Deal as Coronavirus Deaths Near 95,000

FRIDAY, May 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Thursday it would provide up to $1.2 billion to the drug company AstraZeneca to develop a potential coronavirus vaccine from a lab in Oxford, U.K.

The fourth, and largest, vaccine research agreement funds a clinical trial of the potential vaccine in the United States this summer with about 30,000 volunteers, The New York Times reported.

The goal? To make at least 300 million doses that could be available as early as October, the HHS said in a statement.

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A new model from Columbia University suggests that almost 36,000 Americans would have been spared if strict social distancing measures had been enforced nationwide just one week earlier than they were.

Earlier Lockdowns Would Have Saved Thousands of American Lives, Model Shows

THURSDAY, May 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 36,000 American lives would have been spared if strict social distancing measures had been enacted across the country just one week earlier than they were, new estimates suggest.

And if those measures had been imposed two weeks before most people started staying home, about 54,000 COVID-19 deaths would have been avoided by early May, Columbia University disease models show, The New York Times reported. The U.S. coronavirus death toll stretched past 93,000 on Thursday, with more than 1.5 million cases.

"It's a big, big difference," Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia and leader of the modeling team, told Times. "That small moment in time, catching it in that growth phase, is incredibly critical in reducing the number of deaths."

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As of today, all 50 states have started to reopen their economies. Coronavirus cases in the country have topped 1.5 million, with nearly 92,000 deaths.

All 50 States Return to Business as Coronavirus Cases Near 92,000

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- All 50 states have started reopening their economies as of Wednesday, more than two months after the new coronavirus first forced America into lockdown.

Connecticut will be among the last states to return to business, when its stay-at-home order lifts and stores, museums and offices are allowed to reopen, The New York Times reported.

States in the Northeast and on the West Coast, as well as Democratic-led states in the Midwest, have moved more slowly toward reopening, the Times reported. But a number of states in the South opened earlier and more expansively, albeit with social distancing restrictions in place, the newspaper said.

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President Donald Trump sent a letter to the World Health Organization director that warned that the United States would reconsider its membership in the WHO and permanently end all funding to the organization if it didn't agree to certain changes in the next 30 days.

Trump Tells WHO That U.S. Funding Will End if Changes Aren't Made

TUESDAY, May 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- President Donald Trump told the World Health Organization on Monday that the United States would permanently end all funding to the organization if it did not agree to make significant changes in the next 30 days.

The threat was delivered in a letter that Trump posted on his Twitter account. Sent to WHO Director General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the letter also warned that the United States would reconsider its membership in the WHO because it was soft on China and "so clearly not serving America's interests."

"It is clear the repeated missteps by you and your organization in responding to the pandemic have been extremely costly for the world," the four-page letter said.

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Coronavirus cases in the United States have dropped over the last few days, even as most states have started to loosen their social distancing restrictions.

Most U.S. States Reopening as Coronavirus Cases Decline

MONDAY, May 18, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- While most U.S. states had loosened social distancing restrictions by Monday, new data shows the number of coronavirus cases in the country has dropped in recent days.

According to The New York Times, in New York state case counts have dropped over the last month, and they have also plunged in hard-hit Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Some states, including Vermont, Hawaii and Alaska, are seeing hardly any new cases at all, the newspaper said.

"We're seeing a decline; undoubtedly, that is something good to see," Jeffrey Shaman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, told the Times. "But what we are also seeing is a lot of places right on the edge of controlling the disease."

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The CDC has released its initial reopening recommendations as six checklists to help schools, businesses, restaurants and other organizations safely reopen across the country.

CDC Issues Guidelines for Reopening America

FRIDAY, May 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As millions of Americans try to navigate a safe re-entry into public life, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday released recommendations to guide schools, businesses and restaurants through reopening during the coronavirus pandemic.

Six "checklists" -- which also offer advice to day care centers, mass transit and camps -- come after many states have already begun to ease social distancing on their own. These final guidances are less detailed than draft recommendations the agency sent to the White House for review last month, the Washington Post reported.

A CDC spokesman told the Post that additional recommendations may still come from the agency. The six checklists were ready for release, so the Trump administration decided to put them out while other guidelines make their way through the review process, the spokesman added.

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In the past eight weeks, 36 million Americans have lost their jobs as the country went into lockdown to try and slow the spread of COVID-19.

US Jobless Numbers Soar While WHO Warns Coronavirus Isn't Going Away

THURSDAY, May 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The coronavirus crisis has pushed almost 3 million more Americans into the ranks of the unemployed, according to new statistics released Thursday. At the same time, the World Health Organization warned that the new virus could be here to stay.

In the past eight weeks, a whopping 36 million Americans have lost their jobs as the country went into lockdown to try and slow the spread of COVID-19.

The statistics served as a grim reminder of the economic carnage the coronavirus pandemic has wrought so far, with no end in sight.

"It is important to put this on the table: This virus may become just another endemic virus in our communities, and this virus may never go away," Mike Ryan, the head of the WHO emergency response team, said Thursday, the New York Times reported.

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