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Our latest HD Live! discussion is on the rising trend of telemedicine and its future in health care.

Mabel Jong from our liveblog team speaks with Dr. Ateev Mehrotra, from Harvard Medical School, and Dr. Rujuta Saksena, an oncologist, about the use of telemedicine, how it's shaping the future of health care and what health care workers should know about the best practices of telemedicine.

Watch our in-depth discussion above, and see our past HD Lives and other videos on our YouTube channel.

Our latest HD Live! discussion is on how countries have contained COVID-19 and whether the United States can do the same with universal masking and certain other health strategies.

Mabel Jong from our liveblog team speaks with Dr. Robert Brook, a professor of medicine at UCLA and the distinguished chair in the health care services program at the RAND Corporation, and Dr. May Chu, a clinical professor of epidemiology with the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Watch our in-depth discussion above, and see our past HD Lives and other videos on our YouTube channel.

Our latest HD Live! discussion is on the impact of COVID-19 on mental health.

Mabel Jong from our liveblog team speaks with Dr. Don Mordecai, National Mental Health and Wellness Lead at Kaiser Permanente.

Watch our in-depth discussion above, and see our past HD Lives and other videos on our YouTube channel.

Our latest HD Live! discussion is on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and what two experts with differing opinions think of reopening the country.

Mabel Jong from our liveblog team speaks with Dr. Marjorie Jenkins, Dean of the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, and Dr. Thomas Giordano, Section Chief, Infectious Diseases, at Baylor College of Medicine.

Watch our in-depth discussion above, and see our past HD Lives and other videos on our YouTube channel.

The FDA now says the drugs should not be used outside of clinical trials.

FDA Pulls Emergency Approval of Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19

MONDAY, June 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has withdrawn its emergency authorization for the use of two malaria drugs championed by President Donald Trump in the fight against COVID-19.

The agency said in a letter Monday that the drugs, hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, are "unlikely to be effective" as treatments for the coronavirus, The New York Times reported.

The FDA now says the drugs should not be used outside of clinical trials.

Read the full HealthDay story.

Can face masks and face shields help fight the spread of COVID-19 — and is one better than the other? Watch the video above.

For more HealthDay videos, check out our YouTube channel.

Join us Thursday, June 18th at 2 p.m. ET for an informational webinar on healthcare public relations and communications in the difficult and unprecedented era of COVID-19.

The webinar will be hosted by HealthDay's Executive Editor Ernie Mundell. He'll be sharing how hospital communications and PR professionals can make their press releases go further, and he'll also discuss the kinds of positive hospital stories that are now getting traction in the media.

Attendees will have the option to ask questions before and during the webinar, as well as interact with us afterward.

Sign up here.

Sailors who took infection prevention measures were less likely to be infected.

Navy Ship Outbreak Shows Most Young Aren't Spared COVID Symptoms

TUESDAY, June 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- When COVID-19 strikes the young, the lion's share of patients still show symptoms, a new report on a coronavirus outbreak aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier suggests.

In late March, the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Guam after numerous sailors on the ship developed COVID-19. In April, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated the outbreak by checking the lab findings for 382 service members on the carrier.

In the outbreak, there was widespread transmission of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) among young, healthy adults living in close quarters who mostly showed mild symptoms, the researchers reported June 9 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a CDC publication.

Read the full HealthDay story.

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