Back to top

Researchers Develop Rapid COVID-19 Diagnostic Test That Can Detect the Virus in Just 10 Minutes

Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have developed a new COVID-19 diagnostic test that only takes 10 minutes to complete. The test does not use advanced laboratory equipment commonly used to amplify genetic material for diagnostic testing.

The test begins by taking a nasal swab or saliva sample from a patient. Once the sample is obtained, RNA is extracted from the sample in a process that takes about 10 minutes. The test uses uses highly specific molecules attached to gold nanoparticles to scan the extracted RNA and detect genetic material that is unique to the coronavirus. When coronavirus RNA is present, the test's biosensor binds to the specific part of the coronavirus and the test turns from purple to blue.

"Based on our preliminary results, we believe this promising new test may detect RNA material from the virus as early as the first day of infection. Additional studies are needed, however, to confirm whether this is indeed the case," said study leader Dipanjan Pan, PhD, Professor of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and Pediatrics at the UMSOM, in a press release.

The next step is to get approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency use authorization (EUA). While more clinical studies are warranted to determine the efficacy of the test, researchers hope that the test will be a quicker and less expensive alternative to the standard COVID-19 lab test.

Read the press release.

In our latest HealthDay Now interview, Mabel Jong spoke to Dr. G. Caleb Alexander, a professor at Johns Hopkins who served on the FDA advisory committee that nearly unanimously advised against approving Biogen's new Alzheimer's drug. Dr. Alexander shared his thoughts on the drug's highly uncertain efficacy and discussed whether the FDA's reputation has been permanently damaged by the controversial approval of the drug.

Watch the in-depth discussion above, and see our past HealthDay Nows and other videos on our YouTube channel.

In our latest HealthDay Now interview, Dr. Anton Porsteinsson, a principal investigator for the Biogen aducanumab trial, and Dr. Ken Lin, a primary care physician, discuss the controversial new Alzheimer's drug and whether it will provide any benefit to patients, despite its highly uncertain efficacy and steep cost.

Watch the in-depth discussion above, and see our past HealthDay Nows and other videos on our YouTube channel.

In our latest HealthDay Now interview, Mabel Jong heard from experts with inside knowledge on the FDA's controversial approval of aducanumab.

First up is Dr. G. Caleb Alexander, a professor at Johns Hopkins who served on the FDA advisory committee that nearly unanimously advised against approving Biogen's controversial new Alzheimer's drug. Then, a conversation between Dr. Anton Porsteinsson, a principal investigator for the drug trial, and Dr. Ken Lin, a primary care physician who, like most clinicians surveyed in a new poll, has his concerns and has said he will not prescribe the new drug.

Watch the in-depth discussion above, and see our past HealthDay Nows and other videos on our YouTube channel.

The 2021 conference of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has concluded. This year, the focus was on the pandemic and the many ways it affected people with diabetes.

In our latest HealthDay Now, Mabel Jong spoke with Dr. Robert Gabbay, the ADA's chief scientific and medical officer. Dr. Gabbay shared important takeaways from the meeting and addressed insulin prices and racial disparities in diabetes care.

Watch the in-depth discussion above, and see our past HealthDay Nows and other videos on our YouTube channel.

Latest